Keynotes

Psychodynamic Interpersonal Therapy: An update

Else Guthrie

Prof Else Guthrie is former Chair of the Faculty of Liaison Psychiatry, Royal College of Psychiatrists and former Vice-President of the UK Chapter of the Society for Psychotherapy research. She is currently Chair of the Research Committee of the British Association of Counselling and Psychotherapy. She is a Consultant Liaison Psychiatrist at Manchester Royal Infirmary and Honorary Professor of Psychological Medicine at the University of Manchester UK.

Her main research interests have spanned the fields of liaison psychiatry and psychotherapy. She has a particular interest in psychodynamic interpersonal psychotherapy and has been responsible for conducting several large randomised controlled trials to investigate its efficacy/effectiveness in a range of different conditions and treatment setting. She has adapted the model for patients with medically unexplained symptoms and has great experience in working with patients with MUS.

She runs training courses on PIT twice a year, in Manchester, and is also responsible for running an annual Advanced Course in Liaison Psychiatry, which has developed a considerable international following.

 

Is the practice of psychotherapy an anachronism in the current Australian mental health system?

Henry Jackson

Professor Henry Jackson is a clinical psychologist who worked as a fulltime public practice clinician for 13 years before entering academia in 1991.

Henry and Professor Patrick McGorry (2010 Australian of the Year) from ORYGEN Research Centre developed the early intervention research paradigm in the 1980s which has led to a world-wide change in the way we think about intervening in young people with psychotic disorders and in youth mental health service delivery systems. Henry studies the psychopathology of psychosis, mechanisms underlying positive psychotic symptoms, the development and the assessment of new psychological treatments for psychotic disorders, and factors affecting functional recovery and quality of life in psychotic patients.

His second major research interest includes the structure of personality disorders, their relationship to social cognition, treatments for personality disorders - especially borderline personality disorder, and the influence of personality factors in physical health outcomes and quality of life.

Other research interests concern the role of social cognition and attachment in social phobia.

He collaborates with a number of colleagues within Psychological Sciences, within OYRGEN Research Centre, the Royal Women's Hospital and the University of Padua.

He has authored or co-authored 163 papers in refereed journals, 18 book chapters and co-edited three books. He has been a Chief Investigator on many grants including the large NH&MRC Program and Clinical Centre of Excellence Grants on early psychosis both of which were awarded to ORYGEN in 2004. He has supervised to completion 16 PhDs, 28 other higher degrees, and 33 Honours students. He serves on the boards of a number of journals.

Henry was Chair of the NH&MRC Project Grants Committee for Psychology and Psychiatry in 2003 and 2004 and previously served as a member of that panel in 2001 and 2002. He is an ex-National President of the Board (now College) of Clinical Psychologists of the APS. He is past-Chair of the Heads of Departments and Schools of Psychology (HODSPA) (2006-7). For a period of 3 years (2007-2009) Henry was the elected President of the Australasian Society for Psychiatric Research. Since 2008 Henry he has served on the Australian Rotary Health Research Committee and in 2009 became Deputy Chair of that Committee.

 

Improving Clinical Practice Through Decision Support Feedback

Len Bickman

Professor Leonard Bickman is the Betts Chair and Professor of Psychology, Psychiatry, and Public Policy at Vanderbilt University, where he directs The Center for Evaluation and Program Improvement. He is coeditor of two Handbooks on research methods, a methods series, and is editor of the journal Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research. He has published more than 15 books and monographs, and over 200 articles and chapters. He has received several major awards including two from the American Psychological Association, the Secretary’s Award for Distinguished Service while he was a Senior Policy Advisor for the Federal Government and the Sutherland Prize from his University. He is a past president of the American Evaluation Association and the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues. He has a Fulbright Senior Scholarship to Australia to study how to improve access and effectiveness of mental health services for youth through the web.